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We Couldn’t stop at just flies. now carrying everything but the fish!

Dry Flies

Dry Flies

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  1. Zinger, Olive

    Zinger, Olive

    Olive Zinger: Great natural looking dry fly. Can pass for anything. The transulcent wings can really trigger finicky fish. A good general imitation.

    Starting at: $0.92

  2. Zinger

    Zinger

    Zinger: Great natural looking dry fly. Can pass for anything. The transulcent wings can really trigger finicky fish. A good general imitation just like the Adams, only dressed up a little.

    Starting at: $0.92

  3. Zebra Caddis

    Zebra Caddis

    Zebra Caddis-- This low riding caddis pattern is a great fly to fish in slow or still water. FLIDRYCAD063

    Starting at: $0.92

  4. Yellow Sally, Red Tag

    Yellow Sally, Red Tag

    Yellow Sally, Red Tag

    Starting at: $0.92

  5. Yellow Sally

    Yellow Sally

    Yellow Sally: More subdued yellow stonefly imitation. Try fishing this pattern dead drift, or skate it like a caddis to entice a strike.

    Starting at: $0.92

  6. Yellow Drop Sally

    Yellow Drop Sally

    Yellow Drop Sally

    Starting at: $0.92

  7. Yellow Drake, Parachute

    Yellow Drake, Parachute

    Yellow Drake, Parachute

    Starting at: $0.92

  8. X Caddis, Tan

    X Caddis, Tan

    Tan X Caddis: This fly represent an emerging or crippled caddis. Trout will often key in on these crippled caddis, as they can not escape like the normal adults. A must have pattern to properly cover all options during a caddis hatch.

    Starting at: $0.92

  9. X Caddis, Olive

    X Caddis, Olive

    Olive X Caddis: This fly represent an emerging or crippled caddis. Trout will often key in on these crippled caddis, as they can not escape like the normal adults. A must have pattern to properly cover all options during a caddis hatch.

    Starting at: $0.92

  10. X Caddis, Brown

    X Caddis, Brown

    Brown X Caddis: This fly represent an emerging or crippled caddis. Trout will often key in on these crippled caddis, as they can not escape like the normal adults. A must have pattern to properly cover all options during a caddis hatch.

    Starting at: $0.92

  11. Wulff, Red fly fishing fly

    Wulff, Red

    Wulff, Red--The Red Wulff catches a ton of fish....plain and simple!FLIDRYATT054

    Starting at: $0.92

  12. Wobbler fly fishing fly

    Wobbler

    Wobbler--This is a great attractor fly for big trout. It is a favorite among South American anglers. FLIDRYATT045

    Starting at: $1.07

  13. Whitefly, Parachute

    Whitefly, Parachute

    Whitefly, Parachute

    Starting at: $0.92

  14. Whitefly

    Whitefly

    Whitefly: The Whitefly can be a significant late season hatch. In the Eastern United States during the end of August, when nothing else is really going on, these flies come off by the thousands, peeking the interest of Smallmouth and Trout.

    Starting at: $0.92

  15. White Wulff fly fishing fly

    White Wulff

    White Wulff: Another classic attractor dry fly pattern. This is an incredible fast water pattern. HIGHLY visible and great floatabiliy. A popular fly to fish above a dropper.

    Starting at: $0.92

  16. White Miller

    White Miller

    White Miller

    Starting at: $0.92

  17. Well Dressed Ant, Orange

    Well Dressed Ant, Orange

    This foam terrestrial is awesome! It can be fished as a grasshopper, ant, or beetle imitation. It works great as a point fly for a "Hopper-Dropper" set up. Simply using an improved clinch knot, tie a two feet long piece of tippet to the bend of the hook. Then attach a bead headed nymph to the end of the tippet piece, (like a Copper John), and you are instantly offering two varieties of food to the fish.

    Starting at: $1.07

  18. Well Dressed Ant, Green

    Well Dressed Ant, Green

    This foam terrestrial is awesome! It can be fished as a grasshopper, ant, or beetle imitation. It works great as a point fly for a "Hopper-Dropper" set up. Simply using an improved clinch knot, tie a two feet long piece of tippet to the bend of the hook. Then attach a bead headed nymph to the end of the tippet piece, (like a Copper John), and you are instantly offering two varieties of food to the fish.

    Starting at: $1.07

  19. Wacky Caddis

    Wacky Caddis

    Wacky Caddis-- This caddis pattern fishes really well in the early morning and late evening hours. FLIDRYCAD062

    Starting at: $0.92

  20. Usual, The

    Usual, The

    Usual, The

    Starting at: $0.92

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Dry Fly Patterns

Dry flies represent the purest form of fly fishing for trout. Dry fly patterns are tied out of any material that floats. The feathers of them will come from animals like ducks and chickens, while the main bodies of them will be composed from things like fur and foam. All of these materials are designed to make dry flies float, which makes them a visually enticing way to fly fish.

Dry fly fishing for some, is the only way that they will fly fish. Most of these people will consider themselves to be “purists” as this is the original form of fly fishing. There is nothing like seeing a trout in a beautiful mountain stream, rise up to eat a dry fly from the surface of the water. It is a sight to behold and causes your adrenaline to rush. As a matter of fact, many dude ranches and spring creeks, pride themselves upon being “dry fly only” fisheries. Obviously when fishing at one of these locations, a fly angler will need to have a variety of dry flies to suit the occasion.

Popular dry flies for fly fishing include the Dry Caddis flies, Dry Midges and Dry Stoneflies. These are just a few of thousands upon thousands of dry fly patterns that exist. When fishing dry flies, fly anglers need to make sure they carry a variety of different floatant on them. You will first place a drop or two of a liquid type of floatant on the fly. Something like Aquel from Loon. This makes dry flies have a waterproof characteristic to them, and keeps them floating for a while. Once they start to get wet, and start to sink, or a fish chews on them and gets them all slimy, you will then want to clean the fly off in the water, dry it by blowing on it or false casting it, or even better yet, use a samadou patch to soak up the water, then reapply a powder floatant to it. The idea behind this is the powder will then bond to the liquid that was previously applied, and will continue to make the dry fly float. Some dry fly patterns are made out of mostly all foam, and therefore it is not necessary to apply any sort of additional floatant to them.

While fishing with dry flies requires a bit more skill, it is arguably one of the most entertaining ways to catch a fish on a fly rod. Seeing a fish come up and eat your offering is something you will never forget!